56 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog
kyaryy-pamyuu-pamyuu:

Kyary Pamyu Pamyu x Yura à Hawaii

kyaryy-pamyuu-pamyuu:

Kyary Pamyu Pamyu x Yura à Hawaii

771 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog

20,560 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog
jaredchambers:

Zion National Park, Utah

jaredchambers:

Zion National Park, Utah

8,307 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog

3,935 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog

9,797 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog
mfjr:

Paul Signac (French, 1863-1935), Les Diablerets (L’Oldenhorn et le Bécabesson), 1903. Oil on canvas, 65 x 81 cm.

mfjr:

Paul Signac (French, 1863-1935), Les Diablerets (L’Oldenhorn et le Bécabesson), 1903. Oil on canvas, 65 x 81 cm.

178 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog
ykana:

カピバラのやさしさにホッコリ!背中にいろんな動物を乗せた写真16枚:らばQ

1,179 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog



200,000 sign petition to move ‘depressed’ polar bear to Canada

breakingnews:

image

More than 200,000 people have signed an online petition calling for a polar bear living in ‘deplorable’ conditions in an Argentinian zoo to be moved.

Arturo is currently being kept in a cramped, concrete enclosure at Argentina’s Mendoza Zoo, where temperatures can climb to 104F (40C), with just a 20-inch-deep pool for him to keep cool.

Read more here

luv u

178 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog
agist9:

New Super Black Material Absorbs 99.965% Of Light
 Goths of the world, rejoice. Scientists have produced Vantablack, a product so dark it becomes impossible to make out shapes formed from it.
Surrey Nanosystems, a British nanoelectronics company have used carbon nanotubes 10,000 times thinner than a human hair to absorb 99.965% of visible light, a world record. The tubes are so small photons cannot get inside, but can fit into the small spaces between the tubes, where they are captured.
For comparison, fresh asphalt reflects 4% of the light that falls on it, and after a while this rises to 12%, while coal seldom gets below 0.5%.
"You expect to see the hills and all you can see … it’s like black, like a hole, like there’s nothing there. It just looks so strange," Surrey Nanosystems’ technical director Ben Jensen told The Independent.
The manufacturers grow Vantablack (Vertically Aligned carbon NanoTube Array) on aluminum foil, making it easy to create complex topography that is entirely invisible to the eye. They point out their low-temperature nanotube growth processes give it a significant advantage past super-black materials that require high temperatures to produce, and are therefore incompatible with sensitive electronics.
While there is probably a market for practical jokes, Surrey Nanosystems are talking up the capacity of Vantablack to calibrate astronomical cameras and infrared scanners, which need to be shown the darkest object possible for comparison with tiny points of light. They also hint darkly at military uses, which may benefit from the enormous tensile strength and heat conductivity.
“We are now scaling up production to meet the requirements of our first customers in the defense and space sectors, and have already delivered our first orders,” said Jensen. So far at least Vantablack is far too expensive to be used for clothes or toys but Jensen said, “You would lose all features of a dress. It would just be something black passing through.”
The properties of Vantablack have been described in Optics Express.
 Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/new-super-black-material-absorbs-99965-light#CUwUbfHdcEJjqIW3.99

agist9:

New Super Black Material Absorbs 99.965% Of Light


Goths of the world, rejoice. Scientists have produced Vantablack, a product so dark it becomes impossible to make out shapes formed from it.

Surrey Nanosystems, a British nanoelectronics company have used carbon nanotubes 10,000 times thinner than a human hair to absorb 99.965% of visible light, a world record. The tubes are so small photons cannot get inside, but can fit into the small spaces between the tubes, where they are captured.

For comparison, fresh asphalt reflects 4% of the light that falls on it, and after a while this rises to 12%, while coal seldom gets below 0.5%.

"You expect to see the hills and all you can see … it’s like black, like a hole, like there’s nothing there. It just looks so strange," Surrey Nanosystems’ technical director Ben Jensen told The Independent.

The manufacturers grow Vantablack (Vertically Aligned carbon NanoTube Array) on aluminum foil, making it easy to create complex topography that is entirely invisible to the eye. They point out their low-temperature nanotube growth processes give it a significant advantage past super-black materials that require high temperatures to produce, and are therefore incompatible with sensitive electronics.

While there is probably a market for practical jokes, Surrey Nanosystems are talking up the capacity of Vantablack to calibrate astronomical cameras and infrared scanners, which need to be shown the darkest object possible for comparison with tiny points of light. They also hint darkly at military uses, which may benefit from the enormous tensile strength and heat conductivity.

“We are now scaling up production to meet the requirements of our first customers in the defense and space sectors, and have already delivered our first orders,” said Jensen. So far at least Vantablack is far too expensive to be used for clothes or toys but Jensen said, “You would lose all features of a dress. It would just be something black passing through.”

The properties of Vantablack have been described in Optics Express.


Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/new-super-black-material-absorbs-99965-light#CUwUbfHdcEJjqIW3.99

1,302 notes — July 21 2014 — reblog

spaceplasma:

Tokamaks: the future of fusion energy

Fusion is the energy that powers our Sun and other stars.  It has been a goal of scientists around the world to harness this process by which the stars “burn” hydrogen into helium (i.e. nuclear fusion) for energy production on Earth since it was discovered in the 1940′s.

Nuclear fusion is the process by which light nuclei fuse together to create a single, heavier nucleus and release energy.  Given the correct conditions (such as those found in plasma), nuclei of light elements can smash into each other with enough energy to undergo fusion. The “easiest” (most energetically favorable) fusion reaction occurs between the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium.  When the nucleus of a deuterium atom crashes into the nucleus of a tritium atom with sufficient energy, a fusion reaction occurs and a huge amount of energy is released, 17.6 million electron volts to be exact. 

Why fusion? To put this in terms of energy that we all experience; fusion generates more energy per reaction than any other energy source.  A single gram of deuterium/tritium fusion fuel can generate 350 million kJ of energy, nearly 10 million times more energy than from the same amount of fossil fuel!

Fusion power has the potential to provide sufficient energy to satisfy mounting demand, and to do so sustainably, with a relatively small impact on the environment. Nuclear fusion has many potential attractions. Firstly, its hydrogen isotope fuels are relatively abundant – one of the necessary isotopes, deuterium, can be extracted from seawater, while the other fuel, tritium, would be bred from a lithium blanket using neutrons produced in the fusion reaction itself. Furthermore, a fusion reactor would produce virtually no CO2 or atmospheric pollutants, and its other radioactive waste products would be very short-lived compared to those produced by conventional nuclear reactors.

Fusion reactions require so much energy that they must occur with the hydrogen isotopes in this plasma state. Plasma makes up all of the stars, and is the most common form of matter in the visible universe. Since plasmas are made of charged particles every particle can interact with every other particle, even over very long distances. The fact that 99% of the universe is made of plasmas makes studying them very important if we are to understand how the universe works.

How do we create fusion in a laboratory? This is where tokamaks come in. In order for nuclear fusion to occur, the nuclei inside of the plasma must first be extremely hot, like in a star. Unfortunately, no material on Earth can withstand these temperatures so in order to contain a plasma with such high temperatures, we have to be creative. One clever solution is to create a magnetic “bottle” using large magnet coils to capture the plasma and suspend it away from the container’s surfaces. The plasma follows along the magnetic field, suspended away from the walls. This complex combination of magnets used to confine the plasma and the chamber where the plasma is held is known as a tokamak. Tokamaks have a toroidal shape (i.e. they are shaped like a donut) so they have no open ends for plasma to escape. Tokamaks, like the ASDEX Upgrade (pictured above), create and contain the hottest materials in the solar system. The aim of ASDEX Upgrade, the “Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment”, is to prepare the physics base for ITER.

ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Latin for “the way” or “the road”) is an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project, which is currently building the world’s largest experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The ITER project aims to make the long-awaited transition from experimental studies of plasma physics to full-scale electricity-producing fusion power plants.

Further readings:

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